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October 18, 2017

Democrats Need to Lead the Fight...

This op-ed appeared in The Huffington Post on October 18, 2017.   Donald Trump remains deeply unpopular with the American people, and his...
October 20, 2017

How Progressives Can Position on...

Trade stands out from every other policy issue because Donald Trump’s unhappiness with the status quo is shared by virtually all progressive advocacy...
September 27, 2017

NAFTA Renegotiation Requires...

Trump’s unexpected victory has disrupted progressive strategies to dominate this period, but no area has been disrupted more than trade. No other area...

In the News
NAFTA Renegotiation Requires Innovative Progressive Response
Wednesday, September 27 2017

Trump’s unexpected victory has disrupted progressive strategies to dominate this period, but no area has been disrupted more than trade. No other area leaves progressives more uncertain on their message and how to proceed. No other area will require as new and distinctive a strategic messaging platform – and that is true immediately, and in the medium and long term. Trump’s NAFTA renegotiation will trigger a renewed debate about American trade policy. Progressives are presently unprepared to win that war of words. The failure to prioritize effective messaging on these issues could also have dire political consequences beyond the imminent NAFTA fight. 

 READ THE NOTE FROM STAN GREENBERG & PUBLIC CITIZEN'S LORI WALLACH

 
How She Lost
Thursday, September 21 2017
By Stanley Greenberg for the Fall 2017 issue of The American Prospect.
 
Hillary Clinton’s tragic 2016 campaign faced withering criticism in the press, social media, and now, in Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes’s inside account, Shattered. From my vantage point as lead pollster for the Democratic nominees in 1992 and 2000, part of the closing clutch of pollsters in 2004, and invited noodge in 2016, I have little quarrel with the harshest of these criticisms. Malpractice and arrogance contributed mightily to the election of Donald Trump and its profound threat to our democracy. So did the handling of the email server, paid Wall Street speeches, and the “deplorables” comment. And her unwillingness to challenge the excesses of big money and corporate influence left her exposed to attacks first by Bernie Sanders and then by Donald Trump and unable to offer credible promise of change. Yet the accounts of Hillary Clinton are very incomplete, miss the reasons for her ambivalence, and miss most of the big structural forces at work that made it hard for her to commit to a different path. That is where we learn the most about the progressive debate ahead.
 
This article originally appeared on The American Prospect website on September 21st. It appears in the Fall 2017 issue of The American Prospect magazine. 

 

 

 

 
The Democrats' "Working Class Problem"
Thursday, June 01 2017
This article originally appeared in The American Prospect on June 1st as part of the series on the White Working Class and Democrats.
 
The road to a sustainable Democratic majority—nationally, locally, and in the states—must include much higher Democratic performance with white working-class voters (those without a four-year degree). Nearly every group in the progressive infrastructure is busy figuring out how Democrats can get back to the level of support they reached with President Obama’s 2012 victory. That is a pretty modest target, however, given the scale of Democratic losses. It underestimates the scope of the problem and, ironically, the opportunity.  

The Democrats don’t have a “white working-class problem.” They have a “working-class problem,” which progressives have been reluctant to address honestly or boldly. The fact is that Democrats have lost support with all working-class voters across the electorate, including the Rising American Electorate of minorities, unmarried women, and millennials. This decline contributed mightily to the Democrats’ losses in the states and Congress and to the election of Donald Trump.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE. 

 
TIME: Women Trump Voters Are Starting to Doubt Him (by Stan Greenberg & Page Gardner)
Friday, April 21 2017

By Stan Greenberg and Page Gardner 

President Donald Trump won the 2016 election partly because many Americans believed that a businessman not beholden to special interests could shake up politics, get things done and reform government so it finally works for them. Some of those supporters are starting to worry. The surprisingly close contest in the congressional special election in ruby-red Georgia this week telegraphed possible doubts about whether the President and congressional Republicans can bring change. Now new focus-group research reveals the potential for these Trump voters to become disillusioned with his performance before he hits even 100 days.

READ THE FULL OP-ED ON TIME.COM

READ THE FOCUS GROUP REPORT

 

 

 
Trump's address increases optimism in dial meter groups, but real gains could be modest
Wednesday, March 01 2017
Attachments:
Download this file (Dcor_Joint Sess Dial_Deck_3.1.2017_FOR WEB.pdf)Presentation[ ]2558 Kb
Download this file (Dcor_WV_Joint Sesssion_Memo_3.1.2017_FOR WEB.pdf)Memo[ ]743 Kb

The president began the night with a majority disapproving of his performance, and he ended with a majority feeling more optimistic about him. The speech raised his personal favorability and job approval 11 points and got the attention of minority voters, though Trump’s overall gains trailed the 2009 gains of Obama, who was not digging out of a hole. This is according to dial meter groups conducted for WVWVAF by Democracy Corps among white working class men and women, white unmarried women, millennials, and minorities.[1]

Trump’s performance got high marks from white working class voters and the white working class women in particular who broke for him late in the campaign. He clearly consolidated and built intense support with his white working class base.

His tone and promise of jobs, “massive” middle class tax cuts, and paid leave helped him with minority voters and white unmarried women, as well as with white working class women. Whether these gains become real depend on a Republican Congress passing such an agenda. His focus on safety and crime and securing America also resonated with minority voters. Overall, speaking to a Joint Session made him appear less threatening broadly, though again, whether that is sustainable depends on whether this is really a “New Donald Trump.”

READ FULL MEMO

VIEW DIAL RESPONSE PRESENTATION



[1] On behalf of Women’s Voice Women Vote Action Fund, Democracy Corps conducted online dial meter research among 150 voters during the joint session address: 30 millennials, 31 minorities, 30 white unmarried women, 31 white working class women and 31 white working class men. Surveys were administered before and after the live dial meter session. This research is qualitative and results are not statistically projectable onto a larger population.  

 
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