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Country Ready for 'Universal Health Care' Debate Again
Monday, July 23 2007
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Download this file (053107bbkhealthcare.pdf)053107bbkhealthcare.pdf[ ]1056 Kb
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Greenberg Quinlan Rosner, in conjunction with Democracy Corps, completed a comprehensive study of the most important domestic issue of the cycle, health care. This survey found Americans frustrated with the current health care system, ready to move beyond narrow debates over issues like the cost of prescription drugs and waiting for big, bold reform. The new research shows that, above almost anything else, Americans want security in their health care delivery, health care that can never be taken away from them.

Democracy Corps and Greenberg Quinlan Rosner have completed a comprehensive study of the most important domestic issue of the cycle, health care. The survey was conducted May 29-31, 2007, among 1,000 likely voters and finds Americans deeply frustrated with the current health care system, ready to move beyond narrow debates over issues like the cost of prescription drugs and waiting for big, bold reform. The new research shows that, above almost anything else, Americans want security in their health care delivery, health care that can never be taken away from them. As such a guarantee is impossible absent a universal system, it shows universal health care, both as policy goal and normative value, as a powerful political asset. In their latest strategy memo, Stan Greenberg, James Carville, and Anna Greenberg argue that Democrats should drive the health care debate and make Republicans' timid overtures on this issue irrelevant.