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November 04, 2017

The Democratic Civil War Is...

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October 18, 2017

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How She Lost

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National Surveys
The real election and mandate
Tuesday, November 13 2012
Download this file (dcor.caf.postelec.graphs.111312.FINAL.pdf)Graphs[ ]1265 Kb
Download this file (dcor.caf.postelec.memo.111312.FINAL.pdf)Memo[ ]605 Kb
Download this file (dcor.cafpe.fq.110812.UPDATED.pdf)Frequency Questionnaire[ ]300 Kb

President Obama won an Electoral College landslide and a 3 or 4-point national victory – against the great odds posed by prolonged high unemployment, lack of income gains,  a barely perceptible recovery and political gridlock that kept his job approval at just 50 percent at best.   He won because he was able to engage the diverse national coalition of Latinos, African Americans and Asians, young people and unmarried women who formed nearly half the electorate, despite the fact that these groups suffered the brunt of recession and have benefited least from the halting recovery. 

He also succeeded because he waged class war and won.  That was how he was able to define the choice, winning back voters who had been hammered by the economy and getting them mobilized again.  That he waged class warfare successfully has critical consequences for what is the mandate in the weeks and months ahead.

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Voters Push Back Against Big Money Politics
Tuesday, November 13 2012
Download this file ([ ]768 Kb
Download this file (dcor.pcafpe.fq.110812.UPDATED.pdf)Frequency Questionnaire[ ]236 Kb
Download this file (dcor.pcafpe.graphs.111312.FINAL.pdf)Graphs[ ]1690 Kb

In 2012, campaigns and outside groups spent a breath-taking $6 billion at the federal level, more than one billion of it was by Super PACs. A post-election survey conducted November 6-7, 2012 by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner for Democracy Corps and Public Campaign Action Fund shows that voters are fed up with big money politics that they believe undermines democracy.  In an otherwise intensely partisan and divided electorate, concerns about money in politics unite voters across parties and demographic groups.[1] Changing money and politics is central to the mandate for change in this election – and unlike the potential bi-partisan deal on the budget – voters are united in their contempt for the corruption of money, clear about how the money is used to influence politicians, and open to major reforms to change it. Indeed, the more information voters hear about the scale of spending, the more open they are to major policy reforms. Among the survey’s findings:

·         Voters are deeply concerned that all of this money purchases influence in Congress and drowns out the voices of ordinary voters.  When asked who has the most influence on Congressional votes, the views of constituents ranked at the bottom of the list, while 59 percent of voters said “special interest groups and lobbyists” and almost half (46 percent) said campaign contributors.

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Post-Election: The Real Mandate
Thursday, November 08 2012
Download this file (dcor.cafpe.fq.110812.UPDATED.pdf)Frequency Questionnaire[ ]300 Kb
Download this file (dcor.cafpe.graphs.110812.FINALWEB.pdf)Graphs[ ]1232 Kb

Democracy Corps and Campaign for America's Future collaborated on this post-election survey of 2012 voters to establish their views of the priorities for the nation moving forward. 

And Voters Had a Lot to Say Too
Wednesday, November 07 2012
Download this file (dcor pe 110712 final.pdf)Memo[ ]303 Kb

Last night was a good night for President Obama, Democrats, progressives and the country – and the voters had a lot to say about what determined their vote and what they want done to bring change. 


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Obama closing with a 4-point lead
Monday, November 05 2012
Download this file (dcor.natl.tracker.110512.WEB.pdf)Graphs[ ]790 Kb
Download this file (dcor.natl.tracker.fq.110412.pdf)Frequency Questionnaire[ ]211 Kb

The final national survey for Democracy Corps shows Obama ahead with a 4-point lead in the presidential race, 49 to 45 percent (actually, 3.8 points to be exact).  This represents a slight improvement since our last poll, which fielded before the final presidential debate, when we had Obama ahead by 2 points among all voters but tied among the smaller likely electorate.[1]  With the enthusiasm gap narrowed and Obama almost back to 2008 levels of support with the new Democratic base of unmarried women and minorities, the President has brought this back to the contours that gave him the lead before the debates – and that is enough to win, especially since he has a 7-point lead in the 12-state battleground for the presidency.  

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