Most Popular

April 10, 2019

Trump promised a new trade policy....

By Stanley Greenberg. This article appeared on the Washington Post website on April 10, 2019. Donald Trump disrupted the 2016 election and won many...
January 24, 2019

First national poll shows...

Unsurprisingly, our first survey of 2019, conducted during the government shutdown, shows those saying the country is on the wrong track up sharply...
November 18, 2018

Trump Is Beginning to Lose His...

By Stanley Greenberg This op-ed first appeared in the New York Times Sunday Review on November 18, 2018.    America’s polarized citizenry...

Defining Position for Efforts to Reduce Influence of Money in Politics
Friday, May 02 2014
Attachments:
Download this file (041514_DcorpsBG_FQ_PCAF.pdf)Frequency Questionnaire [ ]214 Kb52 Downloads
Download this file (dcor bg pcaf graphs 043014 FINAL.pdf)Battleground Graphs[ ]1615 Kb51 Downloads
Download this file (dcor pcaf bg memo 043014 FINAL 1.pdf)Memo: Defining Position for Efforts to Reduce Influence of Money in Politics[ ]1109 Kb52 Downloads

New battleground survey shows sustainable support for proposals to reduce influence of money in politics

The most recent battleground survey conducted by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner for Democracy Corps and Public Campaign Action Fund fielded just one week after the Supreme Court handed down its decision in McCutcheon v. FEC.  This survey of the 50 most competitive Republican districts and 36 most competitive Democratic districts finds that voters from both parties and all demographic groups are angered by the influence of big money and remain strongly supportive of efforts to reduce the influence of money in politics.

Across the battleground, voters are deeply discouraged with the direction of the country.  Just a quarter (25 percent) say the country is headed in the right direction; two thirds (67 percent) say we are off on the wrong track.  Voters in both Democratic and Republican districts give their incumbents low job approval ratings and they give even lower ratings for the parties in Congress.

This context shapes voters’ serious support for efforts to reform the influence of money in politics—even when they are exposed to negative information about reform proposals. 

Incumbents from both parties would do well to champion bold reforms like those laid out in this survey as part of a campaign against the status quo in Washington.  These are vulnerable incumbents in the most unpopular of partisan institutions.  Embracing reform and transparency offers them a way to campaign against Washington.