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Voters Push Back Against Big Money Politics
Tuesday, November 13 2012
Attachments:
Download this file (dcor.pcaf.postelect.memo.111312.final.pdf)Memo[ ]768 Kb
Download this file (dcor.pcafpe.fq.110812.UPDATED.pdf)Frequency Questionnaire[ ]236 Kb
Download this file (dcor.pcafpe.graphs.111312.FINAL.pdf)Graphs[ ]1690 Kb

In 2012, campaigns and outside groups spent a breath-taking $6 billion at the federal level, more than one billion of it was by Super PACs. A post-election survey conducted November 6-7, 2012 by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner for Democracy Corps and Public Campaign Action Fund shows that voters are fed up with big money politics that they believe undermines democracy.  In an otherwise intensely partisan and divided electorate, concerns about money in politics unite voters across parties and demographic groups.[1] Changing money and politics is central to the mandate for change in this election – and unlike the potential bi-partisan deal on the budget – voters are united in their contempt for the corruption of money, clear about how the money is used to influence politicians, and open to major reforms to change it. Indeed, the more information voters hear about the scale of spending, the more open they are to major policy reforms. Among the survey’s findings:

·         Voters are deeply concerned that all of this money purchases influence in Congress and drowns out the voices of ordinary voters.  When asked who has the most influence on Congressional votes, the views of constituents ranked at the bottom of the list, while 59 percent of voters said “special interest groups and lobbyists” and almost half (46 percent) said campaign contributors.

Read more... [Voters Push Back Against Big Money Politics]
 
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